News

Louis XIII Cognac and The Film Foundation Premiere THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles

12/14/2019 12:00:00 AM

 

LOUIS XIII Cognac, The Film Foundation, the American Cinematheque & Filmmaker David O. Russell, co-hosted the Los Angeles premiere screening of Maurice Tourneur's silent film THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY on December 13 at the iconic Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. Guests were treated to a live musical accompaniment by instructors from the Young Musicians Foundation. The screening was followed by a Q&A and private dinner co-hosted by Oscar nominated writer and director (Silver Linings Playbook, American HustleThe Fighter) David O. Russell at The Sunset Tower Hotel in West Hollywood.  The guests included industry's most sought-after names in film, fashion, culture, and journalism including: Casey Graf (Actor, "Fired Up"), Eli Roth (Writer, Actor, Director), Jack Huston (Actor), Jana Savage (Actor, "The Perfect Match"), Keegan Key (Actor/Comedian, "Key & Peele/The Lion King"), Laure Hériard Dubreuil (Founder and Creative Director, The Webster), Mathieu Demy (Actor),  Rachel Roy (Designer), Rajendra Roy (Chief Film Curator, Film, MoMA), Shannon Click (Model), Stosh Mintek (CEO, Ghetto Film School), Todd Newman (Writer, Producer, Director) and Ludovic du Plessis

David O. Russell and Louis XIII Global Executive Director Ludovic du Plessis at the LA Premiere of the Restored 1919 Classic THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles on December 13 (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell and Louis XIII Global Executive Director Ludovic du Plessis at the LA Premiere of the Restored 1919 Classic THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles on December 13 (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell and Louis XIII Global Executive Director Ludovic du Plessis at the LA Premiere of the Restored 1919 Classic THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles on December 13 (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell and Louis XIII Global Executive Director Ludovic du Plessis at the LA Premiere of the Restored 1919 Classic THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles on December 13 (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell and Louis XIII Global Executive Director Ludovic du Plessis at the LA Premiere of the Restored 1919 Classic THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles on December 13 (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell and Louis XIII Global Executive Director Ludovic du Plessis at the LA Premiere of the Restored 1919 Classic THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY in Los Angeles on December 13 (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Keagan Key, Elle Key (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Keagan Key, Elle Key (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Keagan Key (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Keagan Key (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Jana Savage, Casey Graf (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Jana Savage, Casey Graf (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Aaron Young, Laure Heriard Dubreuil (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Aaron Young, Laure Heriard Dubreuil (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Ron Newmam, Heather Voss, Dr. Raj Kanodia (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Ron Newmam, Heather Voss, Dr. Raj Kanodia (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Rachel Roy, Ludovic Du Plessis (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Rachel Roy, Ludovic Du Plessis (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

David O. Russell (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Jack Huston, Shannan Click (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Jack Huston, Shannan Click (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Mathieu Demy and Caroline Sarrot (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Mathieu Demy and Caroline Sarrot (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Vittoria Buraschi, Eli Roth (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Vittoria Buraschi, Eli Roth (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Eli Roth (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

Eli Roth (PRNewsfoto/LOUIS XIII)

"To see a pristine print of this beautiful 1919 film is to make history alive with vitality by traveling through time to see it for ourselves – this is only one of the reasons it is a treasure to preserve and restore these remarkable cinematic artifacts," David O. Russell, filmmaker. 

"I'm grateful for The Film Foundation's partnership with LOUIS XIII. For many years, they have provided generous support for the foundation's preservation, exhibition, and education programs. LOUIS XIII is passionate about its own legacy, and it's gratifying to know they are equally committed to protecting the world's cinematic heritage and sharing these great works of art with audiences for decades to come," said Martin Scorsese, Founder & Chair of The Film Foundation.

"Thanks to The Film Foundation and Martin Scorsese, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY can be experienced once again one century later. Restoring this piece of memory is for us, at LOUIS XIII, a real pleasure and honour. Time is our raw material," said Ludovic du Plessis, Global Executive Director of LOUIS XIII.

In continuance of "100 Years," a series of artistic projects curated by LOUIS XIII, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY was originally completed in 1919 to be rediscovered 100 years later, thanks to a meticulous restoration by Scorsese's The Film Foundation, supported by LOUIS XIII. A hauntingly beautiful film by director Maurice Tourneur, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY tells the eternal story of love lost and found; of emotions and memories that shape a lifetime. The Los Angeles screening is the third in a series of events by LOUIS XIII and TFF to showcase the artistic project.

The movie THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY is available as of December 14th, 2019 on The Film Foundation website: www.film-foundation.org

Photography provided by Owen Kolasinski / BFA on behalf of Louis XIII and is available here.

THE UNIQUE STYLE OF A SILENT ARTIST
Maurice Tourneur (1876-1961) began his film career in France in 1912. Over two years, he made numerous films about fiery young spirits, often orphans, seeking shelter and love. In 1914, he moved to New Jersey, and then Hollywood, and spent the next 14 years directing more than 50 silent films. Renowned in America for his mastery of lighting, design, and atmosphere, his unique sense of stylization helped to shape the industry. Maurice Tourneur worked in many genres, but a recurring theme ran throughout his opus: the universal story of women and the ingenuity they often have to use to find happiness - a theme that continues to resonate today.

ABOUT THE FILM: THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY
Based on the novel Marcene by Penelope Knapp, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY is about a young woman, Marcene Elliot, who one day while wandering through the woods, meets Darrell Thorne, a visiting composer looking for inspiration to write a symphony. Darrell finds his muse in Marcene and the two soon fall in love. Darrell writes a symphony named for Marcene and asks her to accompany him to New York for its premiere, but she refuses, fearing the reaction of her Aunt Zabie. After Marcene gives birth to a daughter, her aunt's anger and her own fears drive her to attempt suicide. Darrell returns to hear from a repentant Aunt Zabie that Marcene is dead. He travels to relieve his suffering and meets Marcene's sister on the Riviera where she is conducting his symphony. They marry and return to Marcene's home to discover Marcene still alive but dying of a broken heart. Darrell's love revived; he proposes to Marcene after his wife releases him. Marcene dies happy and Darrell and her sister resume their marriage, now with Marcene's child.

Restored in 2019 by The Film Foundation at L'Immagine Ritrovata Laboratory in association with La Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé. As a tribute to its longstanding relationship with time and dedication to preserving craftsmanship, LOUIS XIII COGNAC has partnered to restore this rarely seen movie to be rediscovered 100 years after. Restored from the 35mm nitrate duplicate negative from La Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé. 4K scanning, colour grading, digital image restoration and film recording by L'Immagine Ritrovata, Bologna, Italy.

ABOUT LOUIS XIII COGNAC
Think a century ahead. Each decanter is the life achievement of generations of cellar masters.
Since its origins in 1874, each generation of cellar master selects from our cellars the most precious eaux-de-vie for LOUIS XIII. Today, Cellar Master Baptiste Loiseau is setting aside our finest eaux-de-vie as a legacy to his successors for the coming century. LOUIS XIII is an exquisite blend of up to 1,200 eaux-de-vie sourced from Grande Champagne, the first cru of the Cognac region. The legendary decanters have been made of fine crystal for generations, mouth-blown by some of the most skilled master craftsmen. LOUIS XIII features exceptional aromas evoking myrrh, honey, dried roses, plum, honeysuckle, cigar box, leather, figs and passion fruit.

ABOUT THE FILM FOUNDATION
Created in 1990 by Martin Scorsese, The Film Foundation is dedicated to protecting and preserving motion picture history. By working in partnership with archives and studios, the foundation has helped to restore over 850 films, presenting them at festivals, museums, and theatres around the world. To date, TFF's World Cinema Project has enabled the restoration of 40 films from 24 countries, representing the rich diversity of global cinema. The foundation is also teaching young people about film through The Story of Movies, an innovative curriculum used by over 100,000 educators across the U.S. Joining Scorsese on the board of directors are Woody Allen, Paul Thomas Anderson, Wes Anderson, Francis Ford Coppola, Clint Eastwood, Peter Jackson, Ang Lee, George Lucas, Christopher Nolan, Alexander Payne, Robert Redford, and Steven Spielberg. The Film Foundation is aligned with the Directors Guild of America.

read more >>

From Noir to New Wave: A Tribute to The Film Foundation

James Quandt

12/4/2019 12:00:00 AM

The TIFF Cinematheque retrospective From Noir to New Wave: A Tribute to The Film Foundation begins Saturday, January 11.

This sidebar to our ongoing Martin Scorsese retrospective pays tribute to The Film Foundation, the organization Scorsese founded in 1990 to preserve and restore our global cinematic heritage, and to educate new generations about its importance.

Of all filmmakers who double as devout cinephiles, Martin Scorsese has done the most by far to turn his passion for cinema's history into a tenacious vocation with his establishment of The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization that has helped to restore and exhibit nearly 1,000 films, including numerous titles that we have screened at both the Festival and TIFF Cinematheque over the past 30 years.

Our tribute is designed to showcase the wide variety of the Foundations estimable work: from low-rent American noir (Detour) to sweeping Algerian historical epic (Chronicle of the Years of Fire); from a rare Ernst Lubitsch silent, miraculously preserved and restored against daunting odds, to classics of Japanese and Mexican cinema and major works of the Indian and Taiwanese New Waves; from a cinematic Holy Grail (the original Armenian version of Sergei Parajanov’s masterpiece The Color of Pomegranates) to a dynamite double bill of the two Hollywood versions of Ernest Hemingway’s The Killers. (And that’s not to mention the Film Foundation restorations of Winchester ’73 and Destry Rides Again playing in this season’s James Stewart series). That we could have chosen almost a hundred programmes of similar riches attests to the enduring accomplishment of The Film Foundation.

read more >>

LOUIS XIII COGNAC, THE FILM FOUNDATION & THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE HOST THE UK PREMIERE SCREENING OF “THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY”

Howard

11/6/2019 12:00:00 AM

Last night, LOUIS XIII Cognac, The Film Foundation and the British Film Institute hosted the UK premiere screening of silent film THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY at BFI Southbank in London. Guests were treated to a live musical accompaniment from esteemed British-based pianist John Sweeny who has accompanied silent films at venues including BFI Southbank and the Barbican Centre. The screening was followed by an exclusive Q&A session and private dinner with filmmaker Joanna Hogg, recently nominated for 3 BIFA awards for her film THE SOUVENIR. 

Jamie Redknapp and Professor Green attend attends an after party for the screening of “The Broken Butterfly” hosted by Louis XIII Cognac and The Film Foundation at The Arts Club in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

The guest list consisted of a hand-picked selection of the industry’s most sought-after names in film, fashion, culture, sports and journalism including: Terry Gilliam, Joanna Hogg, Ludovic du Plessis.  The collaboration between LOUIS XIII, TFF and the BFI was further celebrated at a private dinner and after party held at The Arts Club nightclub Leo’s, animated by music from Manny Norté and attended by Tinie Tempah, Professor Green, Ella Eyre, Laurence Okolie, Daps, Gwilym Lee, Michael Dappah, Harris Dickinson, Hope Ikpohu, Kedar Williams-Stirling, Kingsley Ben-Adir, Kola Bokkini, Lethal Bizzle, Chip, Nell Hudson, Young T & Bugsey, Ms Banks.

Global Executive Director LOUIS XIII Cognac Ludovic du Plessis, Joanna Hogg and Terry Gilliam attend the screening of “The Broken Butterfly” hosted by Louis XIII Cognac and The Film Foundation in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

In continuance of “100 Years,” a series of artistic projects curated by LOUIS XIII, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY was originally completed in 1919 to be rediscovered 100 years later, thanks to a meticulous restoration by Scorsese’s The Film Foundation, supported by LOUIS XIII. A hauntingly beautiful film by director Maurice Tourneur, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY tells the eternal story of love lost and found; of emotions and memories that shape a lifetime. The London screening is the second in a series of events by LOUIS XIII and TFF to showcase the artistic project.

LOUIS XIII Cognac,The Film Foundation and the British Film Institute unite for the silent film THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY

Professor Green, Tinie Tempah and Ella Eyre attend an after party for the screening of “The Broken Butterfly” hosted by Louis XIII Cognac and The Film Foundation at The Arts Club in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

I’m grateful for The Film Foundation’s partnership with LOUIS XIII. For many years, they have provided generous support for the foundation’s preservation, exhibition, and education programs. LOUIS XIII is passionate about its own legacy, and it’s gratifying to know they are equally committed to protecting the world’s cinematic heritage and sharing these great works of art with audiences for decades to come,” said Martin Scorsese, Founder & Chair of The Film Foundation.

Daps aka Oladapo Fagbenle, Gwilym Lee and Tom York attend an after party for the screening of “The Broken Butterfly” hosted by Louis XIII Cognac and The Film Foundation at The Arts Club in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

Thanks to The Film Foundation and Martin Scorsese, THE BROKEN BUTTERFLY can be experienced once again one century later*. Restoring this piece of memory is for us, at LOUIS XIII, a real pleasure and honour. Time is our raw material,” said Ludovic du Plessis, Global Executive Director of LOUIS XIII.

LOUIS XIII is an exquisite blend of up to 1,200 eaux-de-vie sourced from Grande Champagne, the first cru of the Cognac region. The legendary decanters have been made of fine crystal for generations, mouth-blown by some of the most skilled master craftsmen. LOUIS XIII features exceptional aromas evoking myrrh, honey, dried roses, plum, honeysuckle, cigar box, leather, figs and passion fruit.

read more >>

How Louis XIII and Martin Scorsese saved a century-old film

Thomas Barrie

11/6/2019 12:00:00 AM

The cognac brand has partnered with Scorsese’s Film Foundation and the director Joanna Hogg to restore a classic silent film first released in 1919

If you were a keen film-goer in the US in 1919, you almost definitely would have enjoyed The Miracle Man, a silent Paramount production eight reels long that told the story of four confidence tricksters who use faith healing to try to swindle a small Massachusetts town and which became the most popular of the year (it made more than twice its nearest competitor). Or, you might have bought a ticket for DW Griffith’s Broken Blossoms, perhaps based on the reception of his (highly controversial, even then) The Birth Of A Nation four years earlier, the film widely regarded as rehabilitating the image of the Ku Klux Klan. And you might also have seen The Broken Butterfly, a film by French director Maurice Tourneur that follows the tragic love story between a young woman who becomes the muse of a composer, plus his tribulations after she drowns herself in a river alongside their lovechild – or does she?

Statistically, it’s very likely you would have seen all three. Weekly cinema attendance in the mid-Twenties hovered around 50 million, rising to 90 million by the end of the decade, when the entire US population was only about 115 million. And yet, a hundred years later, a staggering 90 per cent of silent films – including The Miracle Man – are lost or damaged beyond repair, as are 50 per cent of films made before 1950.

It was this sad fact that spurred famous cinephile Martin Scorsese to found The Film Foundation (TFF) in 1990, a charity that restores and preserves vintage films and educates schoolchildren on their importance. And this week, in association with the iconic cognac brand Louis XIII, TFF held the first ever UK screening of a restored version of Tourneur’s The Broken Butterfly at London’s British Film Institute on the South Bank.

The Broken Butterfly, before and after restoration

The partnership didn’t spring from nothing; Louis XIII global executive director Ludovic du Plessis first encountered Scorsese during publicity for 100 Years, a 2015 film that the brand commissioned in order to lock it away ahead of its release in the year 2115 (ie, a century after production). The concept was a nod to Louis XIII’s own brand heritage: the cognac is made using the most precious eaux de vie – doubly distilled wines – and each decanter is the life achievement of generations of cellar masters. When Scorsese came across 100 Years, he was impressed, but raised a valid question: as well as looking a century into the future, why not look to the past? Du Plessis agreed and Louis XIII decided to fund the restoration of a film from 1919. The Broken Butterfly was the result.

At the screening in London, the British director and TFF board member Joanna Hogg spoke about the importance of preserving films from the past, comparing the routine loss of early silent classics to the (unthinkable) inability to read a copy of War And Peace, or to allow a Caravaggio in need of restoration to rot away. Hogg also spoke to GQ about her involvement with Scorsese and TFF, whose board she joined “about a month ago”. The two directors first met in 2014, after Scorsese saw her second film, Archipelago, and bonded over an interest in old films, says Hogg, “which include Michael Powell and British cinema of the Thirties and Forties”. “On one visit to his house I went away clutching a DVD of Night Of The Demon [a classic British horror film from 1957 directed by Jacques Tourneur, son of Maurice Tourneur of The Broken Butterfly] and the short stories of MR James, after a discussion about ghost films and what film I should make next.”

Ludovic du Plessis and Joanna Hogg toast at the BFI

In talking to Scorsese, who executive produced The Souvenir, Hogg’s most recent film, she also realised that she wasn’t taking enough care to digitally preserve her own films. The Rehearsal, which she shot on black-and-white 16mm film stock in 1985, only existed in rushes on a VHS tape; Hogg had allowed her film school to destroy the other copies. “I don’t like to watch my films after I’ve finished making them,” Hogg notes, “making it easy to ignore what happens to them in the future. However, I realise, whatever I think now, I must respect other people may want to view the work in the future.” It’s a sentiment echoed by Du Plessis. “It’s about heritage, transmission and asking, ‘How do we make sure that what we do today will be there in the next century?’” he says of the similarities between making Louis XIII and The Film Foundation’s preservation efforts. “Time is our raw material.”

At the screening of The Broken Butterfly, Hogg also echoed some of Scorsese’s recent qualms about the state of modern cinema, describing it as increasingly “homogenous” and questioning whether she would be able to produce the sort of socially realistic, low-budget character studies that she has mastered over more than a decade. Scorsese, for his part, has described the Marvel movies that have dominated the box office for the past decade as “theme parks” and penned a New York Times op-ed in which he doubled down on his stance that we risk losing the confusing, human side of the medium in favour of easy, formulaic blockbusters that take no creative risks.

So for Hogg, the work that The Film Foundation is doing with Louis XIII is essential. All films – not just the most popular ten per cent – should be preserved. “Whatever we think of our work now,” she says, “we should allow future generations to be the judge. How can we know which films will be the ones to be cherished and watched in the future?”

read more >>

1234Next

News Archive

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

1999

1998

1995

1990


categories